Type a Japanese eyewear brand - helvetica and garamond shaped spectacle frames

Helvetica for your nose. Eyeglasses inspired by Type.

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New Japanese eyewear brand Type is turning two of the most famous fonts in history into spectacle frames: Helvetica and Garamond. Type is a collaboration effort of Oh My Glasses with Tokyo based advertising agency Weiden + Kennedy.

Type a Japanese eyewear brand - helvetica and garamond shaped spectacle frames

Interestingly the frames take cues from the actual shapes of the fonts and come in two weights (regular & bold) and variety of colours and lenses. It will be interesting to see if other fonts will be added to the line-up. Let`s hope it won`t be Comic Sans. If I had to pick one font – which is dearest to the Japanese designers for quite a while already – it would have to be FF DIN (you can discover this font, or derivatives everywhere in Japanese advertising).

Type a Japanese eyewear brand - helvetica and garamond shaped spectacle framestype-japanese-eyewear-brand-helvetica-garamond-design-people

The new brand comes with this luscious - all caps – claim:

YOU ARE A CHARACTER.
YOU HAVE A VOICE AND A STYLE.
YOU’RE STRAIGHT. OR YOU’RE ODD.
YOU’RE CLASSIC OR COMPLICATED OR LIGHT OR CLUNKY OR SIMPLE
AND YOU ARE WHAT YOU ARE AND THAT’S GOOD
BECAUSE THAT MAKES YOUR TYPE THE TYPE WE LIKE.

Type a Japanese eyewear brand - helvetica and garamond shaped spectacle frames

I have the suspicion this brand will sell well with the general hipster type (no pun intended) and requires facial hair and a skateboard to round off the appearance (Or: how about a Helvetica T-shirt?).

Personally I am still waiting for italics.

p.s. I haven`t cracked this one: The Type tumbler account features similar Japanese storefront lettering samples as found on the Noramoji site. If anyone has ideas let me know in the comments.

Source Credit:
Type

Author Information


Founder & designer at Tokyo based Bento Graphics Inc. Specialities are corporate identity design, interface design, user experience design and website/mobile development with responsive design.

Comments (2) Write a comment

  1. “Interestingly the frames take cues from the actual shapes of the fonts”
    yes exactly 2 points for both versions // looking at the vertical and horizontal strokes and other characteristics of both fonts they did not really do a convincing job //
    the frames look like what hipsters have been wearing for some years already //
    is this just a marketing gag targeting hipsters whit a type geek fairy tale ? //

    Reply

  2. It definitely seems like a rather a well-orchestrated marketing gimmick. The way they have pitched it probably deserves more attention than the actual frames. But I have to give it to them, it`s a pretty unique idea (at least I haven`t heard of a similar type-meets-frame concept before).

    Reply

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